Personality Dynamics





 


Turning blind spots into bright spots!

The Nine Types

Each of the descriptions below include a type specific non-conscious core set-up. It is this set-up that accounts for the motivation underlying behavior. There is also a list of some of the behavioral characteristics of each type. Click on this link for a description of what we mean by a non-conscious core set-up.

 Type One: The Reformer, Judge, Crusader, Perfectionist

Type One Non-conscious Core Set-up

Core Belief: Bad people are judged and good people are rewarded. Therefore, I must strive to be perfect in order to be valued and loved.
Core Concern:

Being so bad or wrong that I will be completely unworthy.

Life Strategy:

Correcting errors and attempting to make things and people better; being logical, organized and disciplined workers. Self-improvement.

Attention Goes To:

Mistakes, what must be corrected. Striving for improvement, even perfection.

Sticking Point:

Anger (in the form of resentment or irritation) directed at one’s self, others and the world, for errors and inconsistency.

Defense Mechanism:

Repressing feelings or behaviors that the One considers " inappropriate" while acting completely opposite to those feelings.

What Gets Blocked:

Personal pleasure and the freeing ability to accept oneself as is, including all needs, wants and feelings. The ability to relax and experience serenity.

What Strengthens:

Attention to detail and quality.

Core Values: Goodness. Improvement of self and the world. Excellence.

Type One Behavioral Characteristics

Persona:

I am correct - I have it all together.

Speaking Style:

Precise, efficient and straight to the point. More focus on facts than feelings and can edit their own conversation while they are speaking. Liberal use of the word “should”.

Body Language:

Often clothing is well-coordinated. Good posture and direct eye contact. Sometimes exhibit a tight jaw. Energy is focused and they may give the message of being too busy to be interrupted.

Avoidance: Anger – a perfect person would not be angry.
Blind Spots:

Out of touch with internal anger. Unaware of how critical, impatient and resentful they may appear to others. May not see that their adherence to high standards and wanting to get things “right” can come across as inflexibility.

Triggers:

Error and/or blatant mistakes. Irresponsibility. Complacency. Criticism. Chaos. Injustice.

At Worst:

Feel constant pressure from their harsh internal critic. Chronic internal conflict, tension and worry. Self-righteous. Overly critical. Perfectionistic. Strict & Demanding. Sharp.

What Helps: Learning to observe their own judgments and criticalness as clues to their own repressed needs. Allowing themselves to thoroughly experience fun and pleasure on a regular basis.
At Best:

Balanced and fair in their assessments of themselves and others. Able to accept the gray areas of life. Experience serenity as a natural part of living. Truthful and live a life of high integrity. Responsible. Reliable. Strive for excellence. Thorough. Integrous leaders who inspire others to be their best.

At Work:

Like clear guidelines, and complete information before making decisions; dislike chaos and constant change. Better in situations where rules and regulations are known, honored and followed.

 

 Type Two:  The Helper, Pleaser, Giver, Caretaker

Type Two Non-conscious Core Set-up

Core Belief: I am only valuable when I meet others' needs.
Core Concern: If I can’t give I won’t be loved; fear of being unneeded and useless to others.
Life Strategy:

Focusing on others' needs and wants and ignoring their own.

Attention Goes To:

Scanning for opportunities to be of service and ways to flatter others. Focused on others' perceived needs and how to meet them.

Sticking Point:

Pride – the satisfaction of being the “only” or best one to get the task done or make others feel good.

Defense Mechanism: Repression of personal feelings, becoming need-less and want-less.
What Gets Blocked:

The natural flow of giving and receiving with grace and sincerity and the experience of humility that comes with that freedom.

What Strengthens:

“Radar” for other's feelings.

Core Values: Relationships. Love. Generosity.

Type Two Behavioral Characteristics

Persona: I am loving and helpful.
Speaking Style: Flattery, great listeners with focus on others. Ask questions and use feeling words. References to others rather than to themselves.
Body Language:

Approachable, warm and often smiling. May have a tendency to stand too close in conversation.

Avoidance:

Personal needs, rejection and being a burden to others.

Blind Spots:

Blind to whether or not someone even wants their help. Unaware that others can see their neediness. May not realize they are giving in order to receive. Others may feel intruded upon by the Two's over-giving.

Triggers:

Feeling unappreciated, criticism, and being left out. Being left alone with nothing to do (introverted types are less triggered by this situation). Feeling their own neediness. Not being able to help. Situations where feelings are ignored.

At Worst:

Manipulative when giving others what they really want for themselves. Intrusive. Smothering. Rescuing. Guilt instilling. Self-sacrificing martyrs. Unwilling to receive from others.

What Helps:

Recognizing their own needs and meeting them, without guilt. Asking for help when they need it.
Giving themselves time to be alone, still and quiet. Daring to express their anger directly instead of manipulating or acting passive-aggressively.

At Best:

Generous givers who are supportive team players. Humble people who sincerely bring out and encourage the best in others. Selfless. Sincere. Empathetic. Nurturing. Dedicated. Great Listeners. Affirming.

At Work:

Like high degree of interpersonal involvement; dislike an isolated environment. Better where their people skills can be utilized.



 Type Three:  The Performer, Achiever, Motivator, Succeeder

Type Three Non-conscious Core Set-up

Core Belief:

The world rewards me for what I do, not for who I am.

Core Concern:

Fear of failure.

Life Strategy: 

Busy accomplishing tasks and creating the right image. Focused on being competent and
enthusiastic while inspiring others and bringing hope to difficult situations.

Attention Goes To:

Whatever needs to be done to gain status, success, prestige and power.

Sticking Point:

Deceit - hiding one’s self behind the image of success and efficiency and avoiding feelings in order to accomplish more.

Defense Mechanism:

Identifying with and becoming whatever role is required in order to appear successful and to keep the possibility of failure out of awareness.

What Gets Blocked:

The feeling of being loved and valued just for being, not doing. Recognizing and expressing their own feelings.

What Strengthens: The ability to achieve and accomplish.
Core Values: Efficiency. Productivity. Accomplishment.

Type Three Behavioral Characteristics

Persona: I am successful.
Speaking Style:

Efficient and well thought-out. Can be witty and “fast on their feet”. Will adjust their pace or diction to match whomever they are talking to.

Body Language:

Look put together in order to impress. Threes know how to dress for success. They know how to hold their bodies, turn their heads and use eye contact for maximum impact. They walk like they own the place.

Avoidance: Failure.
Blind Spots:

How driven they appear to others. Can be dismissive or impatient when in a hurry. Their obvious fear of criticism keeps others from giving them vital feedback.

Triggers:

Their good work being overlooked. Being ignored. Anyone seeing the insecurity behind their persona. Being put in a position of likely failure.

At Worst:

Competitive status seekers. Workaholics who believe they are the role they are playing. Obsessive overachievers in order to project the best image. May cut corners in a trade-off for efficiency. Chameleon–like. Self-promoting.

What Helps:

Slowing down. Telling the truth about themselves to someone they trust. Learning to acknowledge and honor their feelings as valuable barometers to personal needs, wants and activity.

At Best:

Adaptable. Optimistic. Dynamic. Multi-faceted. Self-confident. Highly accomplished. Purposeful. Effective leaders. An inspiration to others.

At Work:

Like fast-moving environments where there are opportunities for recognition and advancement; dislike inactivity with no clear game plan. Better in situations where they’re self-responsible, efficient, and a multitasking style is appreciated.

 

 Type Four:  The Romantic, Individualist, Artist, Aesthetic

Type Four Non-conscious Core Set-up

Core Belief:

I have been abandoned, therefore an essential connection is missing.

Core Concern:

Being deficient and ordinary.

Life Strategy:

Attempting to be special and unique in order to cover the ordinariness and boredom of everyday living. Creating crisis for drama and intensity.

Attention Goes To:     

What is missing. How deeper connection, more beauty and intensity can be attained.

Sticking Point:

Envy – noticing what others are or have that sets off a feeling of longing or of being "less than" in comparison. Longing. Melancholy. 

Defense
Mechanism:

Internalization- Rather than truly feeling the original sense of loss and abandonment, an
idealization of what is desired is internalized. This is used as a point of comparison against which
others (people, things, events) are judged and found lacking. This creates a sense of melancholy and longing, which is a familiar, manageable feeling and is safer than the pain of perceived abandonment.

What Gets Blocked: The feelings of being loved regardless of deficiencies and, ultimately, the experience of gratitude and equanimity for what is present.
What Strengthens:

Appreciation for the breadth and depth of life

Core Values: Authenticity. Originality. Aethestics. Deep Connection.

Type Four Behavioral Characteristics

Persona: I am special and unique. Definitely not ordinary.
Speaking Style: Dramatic, either a quiet well-modulated voice or an intense, often urgent cadence. Easily share personal stories, use “I “and “me” often in speaking and  frequently pull the conversation back to their own experience. Share difficult and painful feelings without thinking about the impact on others.
Body Language:

Can appear intense to others with focused eye contact and demand for undivided attention. May lean toward those with whom they are talking. Eyes may appear sad and tear up easily.

Avoidance:

Ordinariness of any kind. Mundane surroundings or repetitive, boring jobs. Situations and opportunities that they don’t do well in and which make them feel deficient.

Blind Spots:

Miss the balance and perfection in the present moment. Unaware of how dramatic and intense they appear to others. Tend to pull the conversation toward self. Create drama to dispel feelings of boredom and being ordinary. Others may see them as self-absorbed.

Triggers:

Envy, comparing self to others. Personal rejection, being slighted, snubbed or feeling demeaned, or expected to do low level ordinary tasks.

At Worst:

Exaggerated mood swings. Possessive. Controlling and demanding. Envious, which often looks like criticism. Demanding of attention. Overly sensitive and misunderstood. A high-maintenance person.

What Helps:

Exercise and creative expression. Being in the present moment. Having appropriate boundaries. Fun and laughter. Equanimity - internal scales are balanced.

At Best:

Live with genuine satisfaction in the present moment. Comfortable living an ordinary life. Experience emotional resonance to all deep human feelings. Involved and caring. Distinctive, excellent taste. Natural ability to create beauty. Intuitive. Creative. Authentic.

At Work:

Like to express individuality and creativity; dislike rigid and repetitive work where feelings are left outside the door. Best when their originality and authentic approach is appreciated.

 

 Type Five:  The Observer, Sage, Thinker, Investigator

Type Five Non-conscious Core Set-up

Core Belief:

The world demands too much and/or supplies too little.

Core Concern: Ending up depleted or without enough resources to cope with the demands of life.
Life Strategy: Minimize needs and wants, be self-sufficient and acquire knowledge.
Attention Goes To:

Intrusion of things, conditions, and demands which impinge on time and energy and that are perceived as draining.

Sticking Point:

Avarice – a desire to guard the things related to self such as information, time, energy and privacy that are deemed essential to survival.

Defense Mechanism:

Isolation, withdrawal - detaching to observe (either physically, mentally, or both) in order to conserve resources and to avoid “too much-ness.”

What Gets Blocked:

The energy to stay engaged and connected. The experience of life as abundant and freely flowing.

What Strengthens: Powers of observation, analysis and synthesis.
Core Values: Reason. Knowledge. Learning. Wisdom.

Type Five Behavioral Characteristics

Persona: I am knowledgeable and self-sufficient.
Speaking Style:

Broad vocabulary, selective, unusual word choices. Liberal use of words such as “think” and “interesting”. Share thoughts and observations more than feelings. Analytical.

Body Language:

Self-contained, controlled, usually not very animated.

Avoidance:

Strong feelings, demands on self, deep self-disclosure, “too much-ness”.

Blind Spots:

May come across to others as cool, remote or insensitive. Depending on how knowledgeable they are about a subject, may say either too little or too much and lose their audience. In their love of knowledge, they may come across as elitist or condescending.

Triggers:

Demands, expectations. Breaking confidences, dishonesty. Too much emotion. Being asked for a quick decision without time to think and gather information for a response. Unexpected or unexplained change. Not having enough time alone or physical space. Social situational small talk.

At Worst:

Detached from life, observing instead of participating. Unable or unwilling to experience the feeling side of life. Efforts to conserve time and energy ironically lead to the depletion the Fives were trying to avoid. Withdrawn. Secretive. Stingy. Analysis paralysis.

What Helps:

Trusting that the world supports rather than depletes and there is no need to hoard or withhold (non-attachment). Moving into action, engaging in life, initiating activity and interaction. Giving of themselves and their energy.

At Best:

Trusting, engaged participants in life. Reasonable and informed. Perceptive. Objective. Observant without detachment. Insightful and wise. Sensitive. Playful. Innovative.

At Work:

Like to be prepared so want time to think; dislike having to make quick decisions. Better in thinking (e.g. analytical or teaching) positions than those requiring a high degree of personal, emotional interaction. Prefer autonomy to supervision.


 Type Six: The Questioner, Loyal Skeptic, Troubleshooter, Guardian

Type Six Non-Conscious Core Set-up

Core Belief:

The world is one in which it is difficult, perhaps foolish, to trust others; life tends to be unpredictable, even hazardous.

Core Concern: Safety and security - fear of ending up defenseless, helpless.
Life Strategy:

Scan for danger and uncertainty, anticipate what could go wrong in order to avoid it (phobic stance) and/or meet it head-on (counterphobic stance).

Attention Goes to:

Danger, mixed messages and double meanings, analyzing, imagining worst case consequences.

Sticking Point: Fear (often felt as anxiety, especially for counterphobic 6) doubt and uncertainty.
Defense Mechanism: Projection – attributing to other people or circumstances the fear, anxiety, doubt or uncertainty that Sixes feel inside themselves. This makes the feelings more manageable by giving them an external focus.
What Gets Blocked: Faith in life, self, and others.
What Strengthens: Ability to analyze and prepare.
Core Values: Loyalty. Duty. Responsibility.

Type Six Behavioral Characteristics

Persona: I am prepared.
Speaking Style:

Analytical and questioning, sometimes hesitant, while other times bold and confident. Express doubt, concern or worry.

Body Language:

Varies from bold, direct contact to eyes that scan back and forth. Face may show worry. Sometimes warm and inviting. Displays fight or flight reactions to perceived threats.
Phobic Six: Anxiety is more evident in speech and body language is more protective. Warmer and more engaging than the Counterphobic Six.
Counterphobic Six: Sometimes more challenging and “prickly” in speech and demeanor. Behaviorally "looks" like a Type 8.
Most Type 6s are a mix of phobic and counterphobic, some are predominantly one or the other.

Avoidance:

Being helpless and/or betrayed by either avoiding or submitting to potential danger or to authority (phobic) or by challenging it (counterphobic).

Blind Spots:

Trying to prepare for what might go wrong can come across to others as negative or obstructive. Self-doubt may show and cause others to doubt them. Questioning may come across as accusatory, may seem “prickly” to others. May think they are hiding worry, but others see it.

Triggers:

Being pressured. Lack of genuineness. Abusive or incompetent authority. Feeling frightened. Being told not to worry. Others who ignore the downside. Unexpected or unexplained change.

At Worst: Worried and fearful. Suspicious. Contrary and obstructive. Defensive. Doubtful of self and others. Prickly, antagonistic and accusatory. Sarcastic.
What Helps: Moving into trust and courage. Get a reality check – talk with a trusted person and check out fears and doubts for reality. Get clear guidelines for action. Notice when thinking substitutes for action, set timelines and “action check lists”. Take a step by step approach instead of magnifying the whole, especially negatives. Imagine best-case scenarios.
At Best:

Loyal. Trusting. Courageous. Reliable. Hardworking. Cooperative. Practical. Keen analytical mind. Community building.

At Work:

Like clarity and definition, (especially of lines of authority); dislike ambiguity. Better in positions where honesty and healthy skepticism are valued rather than insider information or schmoozing.





 Type Seven:  The Enthusiast, Epicure, Adventurer, Visionary


Type Seven Non-conscious Core Set-up

Core Belief: The world limits and frustrates me and causes me pain and I prefer not to feel that.
Core Concern:

Being stuck in suffering and unable to deal with pain.

Life Strategy:

Turn away from pain; focus on the good and pleasurable things in life; plan for the future.

Attention Goes To:

Keeping options open in order to avoid the pain of limitation. Fun.

Sticking Point:

Gluttony – insatiable quest for new ideas, experiences, options, possibilities and excessive planning.

Defense Mechanism:

Rationalization - reframing negative experiences and circumstances by spinning them in a positive way.

What Gets Blocked:

Acceptance of all of life, suffering as well as joy.

What Strengthens: Optimism and enthusiasm.
Core Values: Variety. Fun. Excitement.

Type Seven Behavioral Characteristics

Persona: I am happy and unlimited, life is good!
Speaking Style:

Quick. Spontaneous. Positive. Brightness and excitement in their words. May flit from topic to topic, sometimes without completing sentences. Like to tell stories. Reframing, (putting positive spin on a negative).

Body Language:

Bright eyes. Lots of animation and gestures, move around. Distractable.

Avoidance:

Negativity, boredom, pain and suffering.

Blind Spots:

Unaware of the distraction to others of their idea hopping and busy body language. Unaware that they may be talking as if they have mastered something they know only superficially. May quit listening when they are idea spinning in their mind or when they anticipate what the other is going to say.

Triggers:

Limitations. Negativity. Complainers. Being forced into a commitment not of their choosing. Mundane, boring tasks. Unpleasant or negative emotions. A “can’t do” attitude.

At Worst:

Addicted to pleasure. Confuse planning for action. Scattered, irresponsible. On overload due to trying to experience too much. Superficial dabblers, missing out on satisfaction of accomplishment. Exaggerated sense of entitlement. Impatient and restless.

What Helps: “Sobering up” in the sense of letting go of the need for so much stimulation. Meditation to slow the mind and to narrow focus. Practice accepting and staying in the moment even if unpleasant or painful. Be willing to let go of some options. Welcoming conflict and criticism as part of the whole of life.
At Best:

Optimistic visionaries, big (whole picture), synthetic thinkers. Productive. Energetic. Satisfied. Spontaneous. Versatile. Positive. Eager and enthusiastic. Entertaining storytellers.

At Work:

Like change, adventure and excitement; dislike repetition and routine. Better in environments requiring planning, visioning and multi-tasking than routine follow-through.




 Type Eight: The Protector, Leader, Boss, Top Dog

Type Eight Non-Conscious Core Set-up

Core Belief: The world is hard and unjust and only the powerful win, often taking advantage of the weak.
Core Concern: Being vulnerable and powerless.
Life Strategy:

Taking action, correcting injustice, being strong, powerful and in control. Creating an intense life, avoiding weakness in self while protecting others who truly need it.

Attention Goes To:

Power and control, justice and injustice, truth vs. deception, what needs to get done, being respected and avoiding blame.

Sticking Point:

Gusto - a desire to live life in a LARGE way. (Lust for Life)

Defense Mechanism:

Denial - ignoring danger, vulnerability and fear (either don’t see them at all or dismiss them).

What Gets Blocked:

Feelings of softness, tenderness and trust.

What Strengthens:

Leadership ability.

Core Values: Strength. Power. Justice. Equity.

Type Eight Behavioral Characteristics

Persona: I am strong, right and just.
Speaking Style:

Bold, authoritative, intense and confident. Often loud, may use strong language. Direct, strategic, sometimes pushy or confrontational.

Body Language:

Strong, physical and intense. Even when not talking, their presence is obvious. Often large people but, even if not, they have “big” energy.

Avoidance: Weakness, vulnerability and powerlessness.
Blind Spots:

Unaware of effect of big energy on others, even when they think they are holding back. Insensitive to other’s feelings or needs. Impatient when others don’t get the big picture or what needs to be done as quickly as they do. May appear angry to others when they don’t think they are.

Triggers:

Neediness. Lying. Injustice. Indirectness. Feeling vulnerable or blamed. Whining. Complaining. Blaming.

At Worst: Pushy and bossy. Arrogant. Aggressive and intimidating. Vengeful. Reckless and extreme. Overly independent and isolated due to unwillingness to be vulnerable. Controlling.
What Helps:

Embrace their innocent, vulnerable self, by reframing “weaker” feelings as progress. Learn to channel their anger. Breathe, wait, count to 10 before taking action. Let others initiate. Allow for other points of view. Understand that excess and confrontation can be a way to mask feelings. Note that preoccupation with power and control can be polarizing.

At Best:

Strong, fair, inspirational leaders. Loyal and caring. Earthy, refreshingly honest. Fun. Passionate engagers of life. Empowering of others. Display an endearing innocence when they have embraced their softer side. Strategic thinkers. Resourceful and tenacious.

At Work:

Like clear chains of command and energetic pursuits; dislike not getting things done. Better in environments where they can exert constructive control than those that require too much compromise or bureaucracy.



 Type Nine:  The Peacemaker, Mediator, Harmonizer, Negotiator

Type Nine Non-conscious Core Set-up

Core Belief:

It's essential to keep peace and harmony and that is more important than my needs and wants.

Core Concern:

Upset, discomfort, disharmony

Life Strategy:

Keeping harmony by going along to get along and containing their own energy and anger in order to do so.

Attention Goes To:

Other people's agendas and inessential distractions, keeping harmony with others and avoiding conflict.

Sticking Point:

Self-Forgetting – losing own agenda easily and getting side-tracked by the needs and wants of other people or circumstances. (Inertia)

Defense Mechanism: Numbing out to avoid their own feelings and their needs through inessential things like too much TV, drugs or alcohol, the internet, overworking or unimportant tasks.
What Strengthens:

Peacekeeping and mediating skills.

What Gets Blocked:

Taking action that is truly essential and supportive of self.

Core Values: Harmony. Calmness. Comfort. Peace.

Type Nine Behavioral Characteristics

Persona: I’m comfortable and easy to get along with.
Speaking Style: Agreeable. May say yes when mean no. Sometimes lot of details. Long meandering stories. Present both sides of issues.
Body Language:

Easygoing, relaxed appearance. Evenness of affect. Smiling. Face may be animated, the body is typically quieter. Warm and open, gentle.

Avoidance:

Conflict, feeling dismissed or overlooked.

Blind Spots:

Not expressing true needs and wants to others can make them seem absent in a relationship. Don’t see that sometimes meandering explanations lose others. May seem non-committal with focus on all sides of an issue. Don’t see that not owning their anger puts the onus on others.

Triggers:

Conflict, disruption of peace and harmony, confrontation. Being told what to do. Being pressured. Feeling ignored or overlooked. Not being listened to, feeling unsupported or being taken advantage of by others. Rudeness.

At Worst:

Stubborn. Self-forgetting. Addictive. Passive-aggressive. Spacey, not truly present. Too merged with others. Short-tempered, anxious.

What Helps: Learn to recognize passive-aggressiveness and acknowledge anger. Express anger directly and appropriately. Find the feelings that are being numbed out by inessential activity and express them. Use structure, deadlines and positive feedback to support personal goals. Notice when going along to get along and express preferences.
At Best: Peaceful. Relaxed. Humble. Present and supportive. Connected and receptive. Gentle and kind. Uncritical and non-judgmental, accepting. Optimistic, steady and stable. Patient.
At Work:

Like looking at all sides of issues and getting along; dislike fast pace and rapid change. Better in environments that are cooperative and planning-oriented than ones which are competitive and sales-oriented.

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